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Author Topic: What is graphene?


gtracker
Moderator
Posts: 4
What is graphene?
on: August 13, 2013, 08:18

Here's one question that I can't answer: what is "graphene"?

Back when I was only a scientific researcher, I used to think "graphene" was a single layer of carbon atoms, arranged in a hexagonal lattice. Two layers of that were called "bilayer graphene", three layers "trilayer", everything above was "multilayer", which at some point would start to be termed "few-layer graphite". I'm pretty sure that "graphene nanoplatelets" are the same as "few-layer graphite". But now we have "graphene foam", "graphene dust", "graphene powder", graphene stars, spheres, lumps, stars, snowflakes, and all kinds of other materials, all labelled as "graphene". How do we sort them all and where do we start? Should we stick to "graphene" as being single layer graphene, and call the rest "nanocarbon"?

By the way, I propose to shorten the word "graphene" to "Gr" in scientific literature, making it look sort of like a chemical element, because it will help everyone to fit their text onto the 4-page journal limit.

😀



swaite
Administrator
Posts: 2
Re: What is graphene?
on: August 13, 2013, 14:52

A good question, Marko, and worthy of an in-depth and ongoing discussion here! I think we all agree that graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms, arranged in a hexagonal lattice. However, there are variations on the basic structure (graphene derivatives), as you note. The term nanocarbon strikes me as a good one. "Gr" makes sense as well. Good stuff!



gtracker
Moderator
Posts: 4
Re: What is graphene?
on: October 16, 2013, 13:51

Here's a good start, from editors of the journal Carbon:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0008622313008002

I think I like all their suggestions. Of course, a few companies would have to re-write their product catalogs to adapt to this nomenclature... It seems that all the novel 3D materials containing a lot of carbon surfaces with many nanoscale walls would fall into the "graphenic carbon materials" category, with additional information provided to specify the geometry and properties.

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