Graphene achieves superconductivity

Graphene achieves superconductivity

A collaborative team from Tohoku University and the University of Tokyo has designed a way to make graphene superconductive, which means electrons can flow through it with zero resistance. This can lead to significantly more efficient electronic devices, power lines, high-speed electronic devices and more.

While exciting, it is important to note that this demonstration of superconductivity in graphene occurred at a temperature of -269 degrees Celsius, and room temperature superconductivity is still far from attainable. However, this research does suggest that graphene could be used to build nano-sized, high-speed electronic devices.
The researchers in this work have developed a method to grow high-quality graphene on a silicon carbide (SiC) crystal by controlling the number of graphene sheets. The team fabricated bilayer graphene with this method and then inserted calcium atoms between the two graphene layers like a sandwich. They measured the electrical conductivity with the micro four-point probe method and found that the electrical resistivity rapidly drops at around -269 °C, indicative of an emergence of superconductivity.

Written by

Co-founder and Co-Executive Director, Graphene Stakeholders Association